Nevada employers be advised: on June 3, 2017, Governor Brian Sandoval signed into law Assembly Bill 276, which amends Chapter 613 of the Nevada Revised Statutes and sets forth a new framework in which noncompetes are evaluated. The amended law includes the following four changes:

  1. A noncompete is void and unenforceable unless the noncompete:
    1. Is supported by valuable consideration;
    2. Does not impose any restraint that is greater than is required for the protection of the employer for whose benefit the restraint is imposed;
    3. Does not impose any undue hardship on the employee; and
    4. Imposes restrictions that are appropriate in relation to the valuable consideration supporting the noncompete.
  2. A noncompete may not restrict a former employee of an employer from providing service to a former customer or client if:
    1. The former employee did not solicit the former customer or client;
    2. The customer or client voluntarily chose to leave and seek services from the former employee; and
    3. The former employee is otherwise complying with the limitations in the noncompete as to time, geographical area and scope of activity to be restrained, other than any limitation on providing services to a former customer or client who seeks the services of the former employee without any contact instigated by the former employee.
  3. When an employee is terminated as the result of a reduction of force, reorganization or similar restructure of the employer, a noncompete is only enforceable during the period in which the employer is paying the employee’s salary, benefits or equivalent compensation (including severance pay).
  4. If an employer brings an action to enforce a noncompete and the court finds that it is supported by valuable consideration but (a) contains limitations as to time, geographical area or scope of activity to be restrained that are not reasonable, (b) imposes a greater restraint than is necessary for the protection of the employer and (c) imposes undue hardship on the employee, then the court must revise or “blue pencil” the noncompete to the extent necessary and enforce it as revised. Such revisions must render the limitations reasonable and no greater than is necessary for the protection of the employer.

Key Takeaways

The legislation does not clarify the meaning of the term “valuable consideration.” Such guidance will likely come from the courts as Nevada employees and employers litigate what is meant by the term, although it appears that an at-will employee’s continued employment in and of itself will not be considered sufficiently “valuable” under the law. In the meantime, without the benefit of legislative or judicial guidance, Nevada employers should assess whether an employee subject to a noncompete has received adequate consideration, particularly in relation to the restriction that is being imposed in the noncompete.

The legislation is also notable in that it reverses a prohibition on judicial blue penciling that was established by the Nevada Supreme Court in a 2016 decision, Golden Road Motor Inn, Inc. d/b/a Atlantis Casino Resort v. Islam and Grand Sierra Resort, 376 P.3d 151 (Nev. 2016). Nevada courts are now required to modify or “blue pencil” overbroad noncompetes to the extent necessary to render them enforceable. Although Nevada employers with an overbroad noncompete can take comfort knowing that the noncompete will not simply be discarded, they should nevertheless revise their noncompetes so that they impose restrictions in terms of time, geographical area and scope of activity that are reasonable.

In 2016, several states enacted laws that were designed, in varying degrees, to limit non-competes, including Illinois, Utah, Connecticut and Rhode Island. Which states are most likely to do the same in 2017?

Idaho:  A bill proposed in January, House Bill 61, would amend an existing Idaho law that has made it easier for employers to enforce non-competes against the highest paid 5% of their employees and independent contractors.  The bill would alleviate the burden placed on such “key” personnel by the existing law by, among other things, eliminating the rebuttable presumption of irreparable harm to the employer that is automatically established if a court finds that the key employee or independent contractor is in breach of his or her non-compete.

Maryland:  On January 27, 2017, Maryland lawmakers proposed House Bill 506, which would render null and void any non-compete provision in an employment contract that restricts the ability of an employee who earns equal to or less than $15.00 per hour or $31,200 annually to enter into employment with a new employer or to become self-employed in the same or similar business. The bill was adopted by Maryland’s House and is now in its Senate.

Massachusetts:  On January 20, 2017, lawmakers proposed Bill SD.1578, which would impose significant limitations on the reach of non-competes in Massachusetts.  If enacted, the proposed law would, among other things:  limit the temporal scope of non-compete agreements to 12 months from the date of termination of employment (or 2 years if the employee has breached his or her fiduciary duty or has unlawfully taken property belonging to the employer); prohibit non-competes against certain categories of workers, including nonexempt employees, students, employees terminated without cause, and employees 18 years or younger; and require non-competes to be supported by consideration independent from the continuation of employment.

Nevada:  A bill proposed in February, A.B. 149, would make a non-compete “void and unenforceable” in Nevada if it prohibits an employee from seeking employment with or becoming employed by a competitor for a period of more than 3 months after the employee’s termination, which is an extremely short duration in the non-compete realm.  Willful violators of the law would be guilty of a gross misdemeanor punishable by a fine of not more than $5,000; in addition, the Nevada Labor Commissioner may impose an administrative penalty of up to $5,000 for each such violation.

New York:  On October 25, 2016, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced that he planned to introduce legislation in 2017 that would, among other things, prohibit the use of non-competes for low-wage workers and require employers to pay employees additional consideration if they sign non-compete agreements.  While he has not yet introduced this bill, Schneiderman has given no indication that he will backtrack from his 2016 announcement.

Washington:  After a bill that would have, among other things, limited non-competes to one year faced strident opposition from businesses, Washington legislators penned a more watered-down version of a bill designed to make non-compete agreements more transparent.  Specifically, Bill HB 1967, which passed the Washington House on March 8 and is now in the Senate, requires that all the terms of a non-compete contract be disclosed in writing before the employee signs the contract. While this revised bill is far less restrictive than other proposed bills, if enacted, it will nevertheless be beneficial to Washington employees.

Stay Tuned: The Maryland and Washington bills have the most traction, as they have already passed the states’ Houses.  Nevertheless, at this point it is simply too early to predict whether the law proposed in those states or elsewhere will garner enough support to clear the necessary legislative and executive hurdles to be enacted.  In the meantime, employers across all states should stay tuned and continue to draft narrowly tailored and enforceable non-competes.